Sex Change


In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Change.”

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The blue ribbon eel is one of the most fascinating creatures of change.  All of the ribbon eels are born male.  Toward the last year of their life, they may begin to turn yellow, and also turn into a female.  All yellow ribbon eels are female, and all blue ribbon eels are male.  A female ribbon eel will procreate after she has changed, and then die, so it is very rare to see a yellow ribbon eel.

Blue Ribbon Eel

As always, if you enjoy my images please visit my website, waterdogphotography.com, or give me a like on facebook at Waterdog Photography Brook Peterson.  Don’t forget to follow me here at waterdogphotographyblog and please feel free to share on Facebook or other social media.

My photographs are taken with a Nikon  D810 in Sea and Sea Housing using two YS-D1 Strobes.
All images are copyrighted by Brook Peterson and may only be used with written permission.  Please do not copy or print them.  To discuss terms for using these images, please contact me
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Everything that Creepeth on the Earth


In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Creepy.”

This challenge is a fun one for me because I love finding the creepiest things in the ocean to share with my landlocked friends.  This image is of a critter called a “skeleton shrimp.”  It is an isopod that is only about half an inch tall.  This one is a mother, and she is carrying all her creepy children on her back, arms, legs, and head.

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This one is also a skeleton shrimp, only he is baby-less.

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If that’s not creepy enough for you, the image below is of a fish called a Stargazer, that buries itself in the sand until its prey comes by, then it strikes and swallows the unfortunate critter whole.

Stargazer

Stargazer

Oh, and did you know that the ocean has spiders too?

Sea Spider

Sea Spider

The “Hairy Squat Lobster” is a creep as well .

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And finally, the snake eel, which buries it’s entire body in the sand and only peeks out a few inches to watch for a passing meal.

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To learn more about the Weekly Photo Challenge, click HERE.

As always, if you enjoy my images please visit my website, waterdogphotography.com, or give me a like on facebook at Waterdog Photography Brook Peterson.  Don’t forget to follow me here at waterdogphotographyblog!

My photographs are taken with a Nikon  D7000 or D810 in Sea and Sea Housing using two YS-D1 Strobes.
All images are copyrighted by Brook Peterson and may only be used with written permission.  Please do not copy or print them.  To discuss terms for using these images, please contact me

Weekly Photo Challenge: Three’s A Crowd


I thought it might be fun to participate in the Weekly Photo Challenge since the theme this week is one of my specialties!  These yellow coral gobies make their home inside an empty beer bottle.

THREE'S A CROWD

THREE’S A CROWD

To learn more about the weekly photo challenge, click HERE.

Meet the Giant Black Sea Bass


In the summertime, I always hope to see the Giant Black Sea Bass that swim along in the coastal waters of Southern California.  The first time I saw one, I didn’t know how special the sighting was. I swam right up to it, snapped its picture with my point-and-shoot camera, and swam off looking for something else to photograph.  It was four years before I saw one again.  And that was from a distance.  But last week I got a real treat.  I was looking for the Giant fish in water that was a bit murky.  I thought, “I’ll just go down by that rock and see if there is anything down there.”  It turns out, the “rock” was a Giant Black Sea Bass.  He didn’t seem to mind my presence, and let me snap around 50 images over 20 minutes before he moved in to deeper water.

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These fish can grow to be more than 7 feet long and up to 800 pounds.  This one was around 6 feet and 200 pounds. They are so large that when fully grown, their only predator is the great white shark and humans.  They were hunted by humans almost to extinction in Southern California waters, until they became a protected species in 1982.  Now they seem to be on the rebound, but you have to keep your eyes open and have a good bit of luck to see one.

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An interesting thing about this fish is that it can cause its spots to come and go.  But when it is dead, it appears very dark or black all over (thus the name, Giant Black Sea Bass.)

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When these fish are in their first year, they transform from a black fish to a bright orange fish looking little like a Giant Sea Bass at all.  But as they mature, they take on the characteristic coloring with large spots that is seen in the images above.

If you are scuba diving in Southern California in the summer months, a good place to see these fish is at Catalina Island, Santa Barbara Island or Anacapa Island.  They are sometimes seen near shore as well.

As always, if you enjoy my images please visit my website, waterdogphotography.com, or give me a like on facebook at Waterdog Photography Brook Peterson.  Don’t forget to follow me here at waterdogphotographyblog!
These photographs are taken with a Nikon D810  in Sea and Sea Housing using two YS-D1 Strobes.
All images are copyrighted by Brook Peterson and may only be used with written permission.  Please do not copy or print them.  To discuss terms for using these images, please contact me

A Fish is a Fish is a Fish


I have been amused, while looking through images over the past year, at how many fish are called after another animal, or shape, or being!  Some are called by these names because they resemble the thing they are named for, others because they have characteristics similar to those things. See if you can tell why each fish is named after something else:

Batfish

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Scorpion Fish

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Box Fish

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Pipe Fish  (Which are so diverse, I had to narrow it down to just these four)

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Sea Horse  (Which is also a Pipefish)

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Frog Fish  (Another very diverse species)

A tiny frogfish  hunts for a meal

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Clown Fish

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Snake Eel

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Baitfish

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Angel Fish

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So, there you have it.  I could keep going, but don’t wish to become a bore. There are sea lions, butterfly fish, catfish, dog fish, and hog fish, and probably many, many more. Most of these animals are named for the thing they resemble, but the scorpion fish, for example, is named because it’s sting resembles that of a scorpion, and the pipefish because of it’s pipe-shaped mouth.

I wonder why land animals aren’t named after fish?

As always, if you enjoy my images please visit my website, waterdogphotography.com, or give me a like on facebook at Waterdog Photography Brook Peterson.  Don’t forget to follow me here at waterdogphotographyblog!
These photographs are taken with a Nikon D810 or D7000 in Sea and Sea Housing using two YS-D1 Strobes.
All images are copyrighted by Brook Peterson and may only be used with written permission.  Please do not copy or print them.  To discuss terms for using these images, please contact me

New Nudi’s! A Nudiphile Episode


After a somewhat disappointing week in the Caribbean (photographically speaking), I came home and did three days of diving along my beloved California Coast.  What a wonderful week it has been!  The ocean seems to be coming alive again after taking a break over the winter.  The warmer “El Nino” waters seemed to have been detrimental to our local small marine animals, but now they are making a comeback.  I found many species of nudibranchs and their eggs on my dives and even some I haven’t seen before.  Here are a few of my favorites:

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This nudibranch is actually a headshield slug called a Navanax.  It is carnivorous and will track it’s prey (other nudibranchs) by following their slime trail until it catches them and eats them.

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This Hopkin’s Rose is one of my favorite nudi’s.  It is very small (about the size of a fingernail).

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This was one of hundreds of Hermissendra crassicornis that were all over the rocks.  I haven’t seen any for a few years, so this was particularly exciting.

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Here is a Porter’s Chromodorid, which is only about an inch long and seems to be proliferating in the Laguna Beach area.

MacFarland's Chromodorid

MacFarland’s Chromodorid

Porter’s cousin, MacFarland was also present and accounted for.

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There were so many Hermissendra crassicornis at this site that they were crawling all over the other nudibranchs, including this Diaulula sandiegensis (San Diego Dorid).

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And to my great joy and satisfaction, I found this Polycera tricolor, a nudibranch I have never seen before.

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Lately, I haven’t seen the nudibranch in the above picture (which I discovered a year ago at Catalina Island, and which has not been defined yet), There have been reports that it is alive and well on the island and hopefully here to stay in California.

As always, if you enjoy my images please visit my website, waterdogphotography.com, or give me a like on facebook at Waterdog Photography Brook Peterson.  Don’t forget to follow me here at waterdogphotographyblog!
These photographs are taken with a Nikon D810 or D7000 in Sea and Sea Housing using two YS-D1 Strobes.
All images are copyrighted by Brook Peterson and may only be used with written permission.  Please do not copy or print them.  To discuss terms for using these images, please contact me

Sea&Sea Alpha and Scuba H20 Adventure Magazine


I have been involved with Sea&Sea Underwater imaging for a little while as an Alpha in their ambassador program to promote Sea&Sea Underwater housings and strobes.  H20 Adventure Magazine has written this nice little article about the program.  Currently Sea&Sea is interested in expanding the Alpha program.  If you are interested in learning more about it, or becoming a Sea&Sea Alpha, this article sums up the details nicely.

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For more information, visit Seaandsea.com, or ScubaH20mag.com

As always, if you enjoy my images please visit my website, waterdogphotography.com, or give me a like on facebook at Waterdog Photography Brook Peterson.  Don’t forget to follow me here at waterdogphotographyblog!
My photographs are taken with a Nikon D7000 in Sea and Sea Housing using two YS-D1 Strobes.
All images are copyrighted by Brook Peterson and may only be used with written permission.  Please do not copy or print them.  To discuss terms for using these images, please contact me