10 Best Photography Blogs


Thank you to Paul from “Pick My Camera” for referencing my blog as one of the ten best Photography blogs!  You can read the article here:

Stay tuned for a tutorial on wide angle underwater photography coming soon!

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As always, if you enjoy my images please visit my website, waterdogphotography.com, or give me a like on facebook at Waterdog Photography Brook Peterson.  Don’t forget to follow me here at waterdogphotographyblog and please feel free to share on Facebook or other social media.

My photographs are taken with a Nikon  D810 in Sea and Sea Housing using two YS-D1 Strobes.
All images are copyrighted by Brook Peterson and may only be used with written permission.  Please do not copy or print them.  To discuss terms for using these images, please contact me
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A Pat on the Back!


Just as I was leaving for a long vacation last month, I received a few honors that I didn’t get to properly revel in.  Being in a foreign country without internet left me unable to toot my horn, so to speak, so I will belatedly honk away now.

Underwater Macro Photography eMAG  featured one of my photos in their top ten for the months of September/October.  Click on the Magazine link to see all the beautiful images that were featured.  Below is the image of mine that was featured:

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The image is of a Hopkins Rose, a tiny nudibranch that is found in Southern California.  It measures around 5mm and can be seen at some of the Channel Islands and along the California Coast.

Another fun honor, was having my review of Sea&Sea’s YS-D2 strobe published by Dive Photo Guide.

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Take a look at the article if you are interested.  I can’t say enough good things about the YS-D2 strobe.  It is a great improvement over the already excellent YS-D1.

Stay tuned for some new and inspiring images from Indonesia.  I’ve been enjoying a solid two weeks in my under water studio and can hardly wait to process the images and post some of them here.  In the mean time, here is one from Lembeh. 20151124-20151124-_BPP7007

This image is of an anemone fish caring for its eggs.  Both the male and the female will aerate the eggs by blowing water over them with their mouths or their fins.  The male has the toughest job though, because the female will scrutinize how well he does his job, and if it isn’t up to her standard, she will rid herself of him!

As always, if you enjoy my images please visit my website, waterdogphotography.com, or give me a like on facebook at Waterdog Photography Brook Peterson.  Don’t forget to follow me here at waterdogphotographyblog and please feel free to share on Facebook or other social media.

My photographs are taken with a Nikon  D810 in Sea and Sea Housing using two YS-D1 Strobes.
All images are copyrighted by Brook Peterson and may only be used with written permission.  Please do not copy or print them.  To discuss terms for using these images, please contact me

 

 

 

The Colors of the Sea


The colors of the wind, the colors of a rainbow, and the colors of the mountain have nothing on the colors of the sea!  One of the most beautiful places to see beautiful underwater reefscapes is Verde Island in the Philippines.  This island has an interesting history.  In 1620 the Spanish galleon known as Nuestro Senora de la Vida, sunk off the shores of this island.  It wasn’t until 350 years later that this ship was discovered and excavated.  Now the currents have washed the remains of the ship away, but shards of blue Chinese pottery from the ship’s galley can still be found on the shores of the island.  Some of the local people collect the broken dishes, vases, and tea sets and make them into jewelry, or sell the pieces to tourists.  Some of these shards can even be found in paving stones in some of the local resorts.  But this isn’t the reason tourists visit Verde Island.  They go there to dive the very beautiful reefs that surround the island.  When there is a lot of current present, the corals will open up to feed and this is what makes the reefs so beautiful.

In addition to the beautiful corals and anemone's, fish abound.  These beautiful pinkish fish are anthias.
In addition to the beautiful corals and anemone’s, fish abound. These beautiful pinkish fish are anthias.
Here a crinoid or feather star has crawled out on the tip of the coral to catch planktonic nutrients as they pass by in the current.
Here a crinoid or feather star has crawled out on the tip of the coral to catch planktonic nutrients as they pass by in the current.
This massive sea fan is not only large, but has a beautiful color that compliments the schools of fish.
This massive sea fan is not only large, but has a beautiful color that compliments the schools of fish.
The variety of corals and anemone's on this reef are astounding and beautiful.
The variety of corals and anemone’s on this reef are astounding and beautiful.
This coral head is one of my favorite images because of the diversity of life surrounding it.
This coral head is one of my favorite images because of the diversity of life surrounding it.
As always, if you enjoy my images please visit my website, waterdogphotography.com, or give me a like on facebook at Waterdog Photography Brook Peterson.  Don’t forget to follow me here at waterdogphotographyblog!
My photographs are taken with a Nikon D7000 in Sea and Sea Housing using two YS-D1 Strobes.
All images are copyrighted by Brook Peterson and may only be used with written permission.  Please do not copy or print them.  To discuss terms for using these images, please contact me

Like a Ghost in the Water


Like a ghost in the water,

It undulates by

Reflecting the moon hanging low in the sky.

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Translucent, it hides

‘Though right in plain sight

It becomes luminescent with soft glowing light.

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Like an ocean flower

With pedals ablaze

It puts on a show to impress and amaze.

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The ocean is pulsing

With a diaphanous soul

Like a ghost in the water for whom the bells toll.

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As always, if you enjoy my images please “like” or “follow” me!  You can also visit my website, waterdogphotography.com, or give me a “like” on Facebook at Waterdog Photography Brook Peterson.
My photographs are taken with a Nikon D7000 in Sea and Sea Housing using two YS-D1 Strobes.
All images are copyrighted by Brook Peterson and may only be used with written permission.  Please do not copy or print them.  To discuss terms for using these images, please contact me

Happy 2015! “Out with the old, in with the new!” (Or Not)


Sometimes revisiting old photographs pays off.  I was browsing through some imagess I took on the Great Barrier Reef in the Fall of 2013 when I came across these photographs.  It is interesting to note that I dismissed them earlier because I was looking for specific shots when I first went through post processing.  Now I don’t have any preconceived notions about what I wanted from these images, and I was able to view them with a fresh perspective.

A curious anemone fish defends her home

A curious anemone fish defends her home

The colors of this anemone fish and the anemone it inhabits are so complimentary.  Mother nature has impeccable taste.

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The Great Barrier Reef is beautiful both above and below the water.

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It is amazing how brilliant the colors of the reef are when you shine a little light on them.  I wonder if the fish realize how beautiful their home is?

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Here a diver swims through a deep crevice.

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All images are copyrighted by Brook Peterson and may only be used with written permission.  Please do not copy or print them.  To discuss terms for using these images, please contact me.

Feeling Crabby?


To some, the mention of “crab” conjures up images of warm butter sauce and crab claw crackers.  I will admit, that I am fond of a good mouthwatering crab claw, but today I was feeling a little crabby, and not in a hungry, appetite sort of way.   The crabs I am thinking of are too small for human consumption, although I’ve seen a wrasse gobble them up without a second thought.  I have accumulated a good number of crab images in my underwater adventures.  It is remarkable that the crab family is as huge and diverse as it is.  There are hundreds and probably thousands of different crabs and they are all on a photographer’s “hit” list as far as shooting them goes.  One of the features I love the most about crabs is their eyes.  They have very interesting claws too, but their eyes are curious and colorful and seem to portray depth and intensity.  Many people may regard crabs as the spiders of the sea, but unlike spiders, I have no fear of crabs.  To me they are fascinating creatures who deserve to be acknowledged for their contributions to the balance of the marine environment.

Spotted Porcelain Crab
Spotted Porcelain Crab

This beautiful Spotted Porcelain Crab lives among the tentacles of anemones.  It has feather-like appendages that it uses to sift the water for plankton and other tiny nutritious micro algae.  The feather-like fans are like little hands that reach out and grab tiny meals out of the water and stuff them in the crabs mouth.  It makes you wonder why he has such big claws?

Spotted Reef Crab or Seven Eleven Crab

Spotted Reef Crab or Seven Eleven Crab

Big claws certainly belong to this Spotted Reef Crab.  Its carapace can get up to around 7 inches wide.  It is also known as a Seven Eleven crab in Hawaii because it has seven spots on the top of its shell, and four along it’s back side.  In Hawaii, there is a story of a hungry god who caught the crab and was pinched by it, drawing blood.  Although the hungry god got his meal, the crabs descendents still bear the god’s bloody fingerprints on it’s shell.

Mosaic Boxer Crab
Mosaic Boxer Crab

One of my favorites is this boxer crab.  It looks like a bruiser with it’s slitted eye pattern.  This one especially so as it has a tiny anemone growing over it’s eye that just resembles a black eye.  These crabs hold a tiny anemone in each claw that they use for defense.  The anemones get their side of the bargain, too.  They get transported around so that they can more easily grab nutrients from the water with their tentacles.

Orange Hermit Crab

Orange Hermit Crab

Hairy Hermit Crab

Hairy Hermit Crab

These hermit crabs represent a huge population of crabs that live inside a shell, coral, or any other object (even rocks) they can climb into.  It is their eyes that mesmerize me.  They can be virtually any color, but the blue-eyed ones are my favorite.  Up close, you can see into their depths.  Their iris bears an uncanny resemblance to human eyes, and their pupils follow you around like those creepy statues in the Haunted Mansion in Disneyland.

Hairy Squat Lobster
Hairy Squat Lobster

This image is actually a squat lobster, and not a crab, but it deserves mention anyway.  It is covered with tiny hairs and lives on huge barrel sponges.  It is also a bit flamboyant with it’s purple veins, pink body, and orange eyes.

Orangutan Crab

Orangutan Crab

The Orangutan crab is often found on bubble coral and has turned under claws at the end of its feet that resemble an orangutan.  They are sometimes orange or brown, and often red.  Their bodies are covered with tiny hairlike fibers which seem to accumulate debris.

Soft coral Crab or Candy Crab
Soft coral Crab or Candy Crab

Soft  coral crabs like to hide down in the coral and have to be coaxed up to the top to pose for the camera.  This one has a friend on it’s shoulder.  They have red, multidimensional eyes that seem to see everything at once.  Sometimes they accumulate “weeds” that begin to grow on their bodies making them resemble decorator crabs.

You can see more of my images on my flikr stream or at  waterdogphotography.com,
Also, I love to make new friends!  Please visit my facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/waterdogphotographyunderthesea
All images are copyrighted by Brook Peterson and may only be used with written permission.  Please do not copy or print them.  To discuss terms for using these images, please contact me.

Winner, Winner, Chicken Dinner!


I’ve always wanted to be an award-winning person. It hasn’t ever mattered what the award was for, as long as it was something I earned and had some kind of value.  Well, I recently participated in the Monterey Shootout.  Now, a shootout is a photography contest that is restricted by time and/or location.  In this case, this contest was restricted to 36 hours and photographs had to be taken under water in Monterey, California.  Participants could submit up to six photographs in four categories.

Anemone, 1st place under water wide angle unrestricted
Anemone, 1st place under water wide angle unrestricted

The photograph above was entered in the unrestricted wide angle category.  This means that the photograph could have some changes made to it via photo editing software.  In this case, I removed a few fish that were facing the wrong way. I believe the photo is also cropped by five percent.

Starfish and schooling fish, 1st place underwater wide angle traditional

Starfish and schooling fish, 1st place underwater wide angle traditional

Anemone, 2nd place under water wide angle  traditional

Anemone, 2nd place under water wide angle traditional

The two photos (above) were entered in the wide angle traditional category.  This means that the photograph could have only a few global changes to it.  In both cases, I bumped up the contrast slightly, and made minor brightness and color enhancements.  These are pretty much straight out of the camera.

Nudibranch, 1st place in under water macro unrestricted

Nudibranch, 1st place in under water macro unrestricted

This nudibranch image (above) is my favorite from the shootout.  It was entered in the macro unrestricted category, although I needn’t have made any changes to it.  I removed three small dots of backscatter (particles in the water that show up as white spots), and increased the contrast.  I had to wait for this slow moving slug to get into position, but it was worth the wait.

Top Snail.  3rd place winner in Underwater Macro, Traditional
Top Snail. 3rd place winner in Underwater Macro, Traditional

Finally, two more traditional macro shots.  The one above is a photograph of a top snail.  They are so beautiful for a snail that is only the size of my thumbnail.   The photograph below is of a hermit crab that really didn’t like my focus light shining in its eyes.  After this shot, it turned away from me and refused to show it’s face to me again.

Hermit Crab.  2nd place winner in Under water Macro Traditional

Hermit Crab. 2nd place winner in Under water Macro Traditional

In this contest, points were given for each photograph that placed.  Then the points were added up.  Those photographers with the highest number of points were able to choose their prize first.  Because all six of my photographs received a place, I had the highest number of points, so I had the good fortune of being first to pick my prize.  There were lots of fantastic prizes!  They offered several different dive vacations, as well as dive gear, camera equipment, and gift certificates.  I chose the top prize:  a 7 night stay at Misool Eco Resort  in Raja Ampat, Indonesia.  I look forward to diving there and taking many more photographs!