Darling it’s Better, Down Where it’s Wetter, Under the Sea!


I’ve been thinking about Horatio Thelonious Ignacious Crustaceous Sebastian Crab.  I think he hit the nail on the head with his philosophy about the joys of being under the sea!  He said,

“The seaweed is always greener, in somebody else’s lake.  You dream about goin’ up there, but that is a big mistake.  Just look at the world around you, Right here on the ocean floor.  Such wonderful things surround you, What more is you lookin’ for?
Under the sea
Under the sea
Darling it’s better Down where it’s wetter Take it from me!”

Well, He is right.  The ocean floor is where all the crustaceans creep about.  It is always a thrill to come upon one of these fascinating creatures.

Arrow Crab

Arrow Crab

The arrow crab has a long pointed head, and shovels food into it’s mouth with it’s two front appendages.

_DSC7473

The diversity of the crabs is one of the most interesting things.  Below are a few decorator crabs.  These crabs take pieces of sponge and moss and attach them to their bodies for camouflage.  See if you can spot their eyes.  They are a little easier to put in perspective that way.

Teardrop Crab

Teardrop Crab

Decorator Crab

Decorator Crab

This guy (above) is completely covered with bits of plant matter, except for his eyes and two front claws.  If he hadn’t moved, I would have never seen him.  The crab below also has some great camouflage going.

_DSC7352

Teardrop Crab

Teardrop Crab

Hermit crabs are some of my favorite subjects to photograph.  I love how their eyes protrude from under the shell and watch the camera.

Hermit Crab

Hermit Crab

20130310-crab close cropped

20130713-20130713-_DSC8858

And finally, the shrimps!

Banded Shrimp

Banded Shrimp

This banded shrimp has a claw on every foot.  Although the two front ones are the largest, he uses all of them to put food in his mouth.

20130323-single shrimp

The red ones above are often found in the den of an eel as they clean the eel’s body of parasites.

Shrimp

Shrimp

Coon striped shrimp

Coon striped shrimp

Down here all the fish is happy, as off through the waves they roll.  The fish on the land ain’t happy, They sad ’cause they in their bowl.  But fish in the bowl is lucky,  They in for a worser fate,  One day when the boss get hungry, Guess who’s gon’ be on the plate!

Under the sea

Under the sea

We got no troubles

Live is the bubbles

Under the Sea!

 

Advertisements

What’s Buggin’ You?


The last few weeks our weather has turned a bit wintery and although I long to get back in the water to my “studio,” I have found an alternate that is almost as enticing.  I have always been fascinated by the little critters, especially some of the more unusual ones.  Happily, there are plenty of odd little bugs to photograph on land.  Here are some of my favorites:

Juvenile Praying Mantis

Juvenile Praying Mantis

I found this little praying mantis one day walking up my arm.  I had been outside thinning the peach tree, and I guess he hitched a ride.  I carefully put him back on the tree where he graciously posed for some very flattering portraits.

aussie caterpillar

Cairns Birdwing Caterpillar

Sometimes we get all creeped-out by insects.  It is hard to believe that the spikey-creepy-crawly caterpillar above becomes the beautiful Cairns Birdwing butterfly which is endemic to Australia.  These papilions can have a wingspan of up to 11 inches.  One of the photographs below is of a male, the other female.  Can you guess which one is which?

Cairns Birdwing Butterfly

Cairns Birdwing Butterfly

_DSC1417

 In contrast to the huge butterflies above, is this little velvet moth that was just over a quarter of an inch long.  It landed on my bathroom mirror one morning where it almost got clobbered by the flat of my hand until I saw it’s brilliant red wings and decided it was photogenic.  It stayed on the mirror all day, and finally flew away in the evening.

20130717-_DSC8975small file

Okay, so on to a REALLY creepy bug. The creature below is a walking stick.  Don’t ask how that thing eats with a mouth like that, because I have no idea.  He was about three inches long and moved slowly up the branch like he was stalking me.

_DSC0505-2

A Bumble Bee comes in for a landing

A Bumble Bee comes in for a landing

One of the most common fliers is the bumble bee.  They are surprisingly difficult to photograph.  That is partly because they are always moving, and partly because this photographer is wary of being stung.  These guys were busy collecting the first of this year’s pollen.

A Bee gathers pollen from a poppy

A Bee gathers pollen from a poppy

As I was photographing the flowers and bees, this little fly stopped by to rub his back legs together.  He only visited for a moment, but I caught him!

_DSC2980-Edit

The bug below is a common nuisance.  When I was a kid, we called them fire-bugs, but my dad called them Box Elder bugs.  He was right, that is the common name.  You have probably stepped on these outside your front door.

20130215-Boxelder Bug

Last but certainly not least; the creepiest of all creepers in my opinion, is the spider.  I believe this one still resides in Hana, Hawaii, guarding the seven sacred pools and protecting visitors from the horde of flying bugs that torment tourists.

20130308-_DSC6583

I have to admit that I have a love-hate relationship with the insect world.  While they fascinate me beyond reasonable measure, they also give me the heebie-jeebies and I wouldn’t want to find one crawling down my back.  Yet, I can’t help being visually stimulated by them.  How about you?